Class Action

  • February 20, 2024

    Bankrupt Co. Stole $100M In Special Needs Trusts, Suit Says

    The parents of a disabled child claim the founders and financial entities behind a now-bankrupt corporate trustee orchestrated a decadelong predatory scheme to misappropriate more than $100 million of special needs trust assets, according to a proposed class action filed Monday in Florida federal court.

  • February 20, 2024

    Epstein's Attorney, Accountant Accused Of Aiding Trafficking

    Two survivors of sexual predator Jeffrey Epstein claim his longtime lawyer and accountant played essential parts in the disgraced financier's sex trafficking enterprise by creating a complex financial infrastructure to keep the money flowing, according to a proposed class action filed in New York federal court.

  • February 20, 2024

    SocGen's $35M Yen-Libor Rigging Suit Deal Gets 1st OK

    A New York federal judge Tuesday granted preliminary approval of a $35 million settlement to resolve a yearslong dispute involving a class of Societe Generale investors who accused the French financial services provider of being involved in a conspiracy to rig the London interbank offered rate for the Japanese yen.

  • February 20, 2024

    NM Fire Victims Sue FEMA Over Compensation Delays

    Ten New Mexico residents with property damaged by the Hermit's Peak/Calf Canyon Fire sued the Federal Emergency Management Agency in federal court Friday, saying FEMA is not processing their claims in a timely manner, in violation of an assistance measure Congress passed for victims of the wildfire.

  • February 20, 2024

    Apple Asks For Discovery Pause During Class Cert. Appeal

    Apple is urging a California federal judge to halt discovery in a sweeping App Store antitrust suit while the company appeals the class certification granted earlier this month.

  • February 20, 2024

    US Chamber Urges 6th Circ. To Ax FirstEnergy Class Cert.

    The U.S. Chamber of Commerce, former U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission officials and others have urged the Sixth Circuit to reverse class certification in a case accusing FirstEnergy Corp. of committing securities fraud in connection with a multimillion-dollar bribe made to a convicted politician.

  • February 20, 2024

    Walgreens Defeats $200M Investor Suit Over Insulin Billing

    A Delaware vice chancellor has thrown out a stockholder derivative suit accusing Walgreens directors of ignoring an alleged scheme in which insulin pen prescriptions were overfilled and the government overbilled, ruling that the investors haven't shown that the company's top brass acted in bad faith.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ryder Investors' $45M Securities Deal Gets First Green Light

    A Florida federal judge on Tuesday granted the first green light to a $45 million cash settlement ending a suit against truck rental company Ryder System Inc., alleging it knowingly overstated the residual value of its trucking fleet, which caused its stock price to plummet after the truth was revealed.

  • February 20, 2024

    Developers Deny 'Shell Game' Amid Push For More Sanctions

    Real estate developers facing potential imprisonment over their failure to pay EB-5 investors at least $26 million in settlement and sanction judgments have told an Illinois federal court their money is not hidden in a "shell game" but rather tied up in receivership proceedings the investors already know about.

  • February 20, 2024

    How Future Litigators Are Training In A 'Flight Simulator'

    Law students who would traditionally experience only a few courtroom scenarios over a semester have begun working with programs that can provide an entire array of courtroom curveballs, thanks to large language model artificial intelligence technology.

  • February 20, 2024

    Trivest Can Seek 6th Circ. Review Of RICO Jurisdiction Ruling

    A Michigan federal judge will allow a Florida-based private equity firm to appeal a decision denying its bid to escape a Racketeer Influenced and Corrupt Organizations Act lawsuit scrutinizing its funding of a solar company accused of scamming customers.

  • February 20, 2024

    $71M Deal Proposed To End Premier Inc. Share Exchange Suit

    Healthcare-purchasing giant Premier Inc. has agreed to a $71 million settlement of a derivative stockholder suit in Delaware's Chancery Court that challenged a $473.5 million payout in a 2020 restructuring, with stockholder attorneys seeking an award of up to $14 million in fees.

  • February 20, 2024

    Cedars-Sinai Can't Escape Ex-Worker's Retirement Fee Suit

    A California federal judge refused to toss a proposed class action against Cedars-Sinai Medical Center alleging mismanagement of an employee retirement plan, finding an ex-worker sufficiently backed up claims the California hospital system should have done more to lower fees and offer better investment choices to retirees.

  • February 20, 2024

    Chancery Won't Block TripAdvisor's Nevada Move

    In a ruling with implications for other Delaware-chartered companies pondering corporate charter relocations, a Delaware vice chancellor on Monday refused to block travel planning giant TripAdvisor Inc.'s reincorporation in Nevada, but kept alive minority stockholder damage claims alleging the vote was unfair and tainted by controller clout.

  • February 20, 2024

    DoorDash Charges Excessive Fees, NYC Burger Eatery Says

    DoorDash was hit with a proposed class action Friday in California federal court by a New York City burger joint that accused the platform of employing a "widespread and pervasive practice" of levying service fees more than the 20% cap imposed by local legislations enacted during the COVID-19 pandemic.

  • February 20, 2024

    Justices Deny 9/11 Widows' Challenge to Damage Distribution

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday refused to revive a lawsuit from the widows of two 9/11 victims alleging a district court improperly allowed all immediate relatives to claim wrongful death damages despite state laws allowing relief only to heirs.

  • February 20, 2024

    Sullivan & Cromwell Accused Of Aiding FTX Fraud

    Sullivan & Cromwell LLP has been accused of knowing about and helping facilitate the massive fraud that brought down cryptocurrency exchange FTX while serving as FTX's outside counsel, and profiting on the back end by overseeing FTX's ongoing bankruptcy, according to a racketeering lawsuit filed last week.

  • February 20, 2024

    Girardi Keese Trustee Recovers $1.8M In Fees For Exide Case

    A U.S. bankruptcy judge on Tuesday approved an agreement between the Girardi Keese bankruptcy trustee, a former attorney for the firm and the Mandell Law Firm to end an adversary proceeding connected to $1.8 million in attorney fees from a lawsuit over the toxic Exide battery plant in Vernon, California.

  • February 20, 2024

    Amazon Agrees To Pay $5.5M To End COVID Screening Suit

    A group of California Amazon warehouse workers asked a federal judge to approve a $5.5 million settlement resolving a proposed collective action accusing the e-commerce giant of failing to pay workers for time they spent undergoing pre-shift COVID-19 screenings, saying it will provide them with all their alleged unpaid wages.

  • February 20, 2024

    Fiji Water Microplastics Suit Heads To Illinois Federal Court

    The Wonderful Company LLC has removed to Illinois federal court a proposed false advertising class action accusing it of misleading consumers by labeling its Fiji Water as "natural artisan water" while knowing it contained microplastics.

  • February 20, 2024

    Ex-IBM Workers Can't Get Justices To Tackle Age Bias Battle

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday turned away a group of ex-IBM workers' bid for review of a Second Circuit ruling that said they had to pursue age bias claims in arbitration rather than court, despite their argument that the decision conflicted with high court precedent.

  • February 20, 2024

    High Court Denies Review Of Wrestler Attorney Sanctions

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Tuesday declined to review a petition from an attorney seeking to vacate a $312,000 sanctions order over his representation of former wrestlers over brain injuries they suffered while working for World Wrestling Entertainment Inc.

  • February 16, 2024

    State Farm 'Bad Deal' Can't Save Policyholders' Suit

    The Tenth Circuit on Friday refused to revive a proposed class action accusing State Farm of illegally denying full uninsured motorist coverage for policyholders, relatives and passengers, saying that the insurer may have sold them a "bad deal" but that they agreed to it.

  • February 16, 2024

    Samsung Ordered To Arbitrate Hundreds Of BIPA Claims

    An Illinois federal judge has ordered Samsung Electronics to arbitrate 806 customers' biometric-privacy claims and to pay the American Arbitration Association for fees it owes in the slew of disputes, ruling that the company can't refuse to arbitrate under its own binding agreements.

  • February 16, 2024

    6th Circ. Rejects FirstEnergy Objector's Appeal In $180M Case

    The Sixth Circuit on Friday rejected an appeal from a FirstEnergy investor who was holding up a $180 million settlement in a derivative suit seeking to hold the utility company responsible for its involvement in a $1 billion bribery scandal.

Expert Analysis

  • When Patients Have Standing For Hospital Antitrust Suits

    Author Photo

    Brown v. Hartford Healthcare Corp., recently decided by a Connecticut state court, provides a useful examination of how antitrust standing issues may be analyzed when patients directly sue a healthcare system for anti-competitive conduct, says Charles Honart at Stevens & Lee.

  • DOJ's RealPage Notice Signals Focus On Pricing Algorithms

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Department of Justice's Antitrust Division recently filed a statement of interest in the Realpage multidistrict litigation to stake out its position that price-fixing algorithms pose a great anti-competitive threat, which suggests that the DOJ and private parties may continue to bring similar actions in the future, say attorneys at Simpson Thacher.

  • What 3rd Circ. Gets Wrong About Arbitration Enforcement

    Author Photo

    The Third Circuit and other courts should correct their current law, exemplified by the Third Circuit's recent decision in Henry v. Wilmington Trust, requiring a motion to dismiss based on an arbitration clause because it conflicts with the Federal Arbitration Act, the Federal Rules of Civil Procedure, and — with regard to the improper-venue approach — U.S. Supreme Court precedent, says David Cinotti at Pashman Stein.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge D'Emic On Moby Grape

    Author Photo

    The 1968 Moby Grape song "Murder in My Heart for the Judge" tells the tale of a fictional defendant treated with scorn by the judge, illustrating how much the legal system has evolved in the past 50 years, largely due to problem-solving courts and the principles of procedural justice, says Kings County Supreme Court Administrative Judge Matthew D'Emic.

  • The Key To Defending Multistate Collective FLSA Claims

    Author Photo

    Federal circuit courts are split on the reach of a court's jurisdiction over out-of-state employers in Fair Labor Standards Act collective actions, but until the U.S. Supreme Court agrees to review the question, multistate employers should be aware of a potential case-changing defense, say Matthew Disbrow and Michael Dauphinais at Honigman.

  • Series

    Performing Music Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    The discipline of performing live music has directly and positively influenced my effectiveness as a litigator — serving as a reminder that practice, intuition and team building are all important elements of a successful law practice, says Jeff Wakolbinger at Bryan Cave.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Securities Class Action Fees

    Author Photo

    An analysis of recently settled cases shows that in addition to the settlement size, plaintiffs counsel in securities class actions appear to be rewarded for good settlement outcomes relative to a statistical prediction, with certain outcomes for the motion to dismiss and motion for class certification also affecting attorney fees awarded, says Edward Flores at NERA Economic Consulting.

  • Aviation Watch: Pilots Face Mental Health Catch-22

    Author Photo

    The recent case of an Alaska Airlines pilot who attempted to crash an airliner in flight highlights the dilemma facing federally licensed cockpit personnel who need psychological help, yet could lose their jobs if they seek it — but a long-running program may provide a solution, says Alan Hoffman, a retired attorney and aviation expert.

  • Breaking Down High Court's New Code Of Conduct

    Author Photo

    The U.S. Supreme Court recently adopted its first-ever code of conduct, and counsel will need to work closely with clients in navigating its provisions, from gift-giving to recusal bids, say Phillip Gordon and Mateo Forero at Holtzman Vogel.

  • 7 Critical Copyright And AI Questions Courts Need To Address

    Author Photo

    U.S. courts have yet to rule on many copyright issues regarding generative artificial intelligence technologies, so developers and users should consider several questions when evaluating risks, developing risk mitigation plans and making decisions about particular use cases, say John Delaney and Sean West at Perkins Coie.

  • Opinion

    Legal Profession Gender Parity Requires Equal Parental Leave

    Author Photo

    To truly foster equity in the legal profession and to promote attorney retention, workplaces need to better support all parents, regardless of gender — starting by offering equal and robust parental leave to both birthing and non-birthing parents, says Ali Spindler at Irwin Fritchie.

  • Opinion

    Activist Short-Sellers Are The Dark Knights Of Wall Street

    Author Photo

    While so-called activist short-sellers have been subject to increased scrutiny in recent years, these investors work in the shadows like Batman to expose fraud on Wall Street, often generating leads that may move regulators to take action, say attorneys at Labaton Sucharow.

  • Series

    Writing Thriller Novels Makes Me A Better Lawyer

    Author Photo

    Authoring several thriller novels has enriched my work by providing a fresh perspective on my privacy practice, expanding my knowledge, and keeping me alert to the next wave of issues in an increasingly complex space — a reminder to all lawyers that extracurricular activities can help sharpen professional instincts, says Reece Hirsch at Morgan Lewis.

  • What Lawyers Must Know About Calif. State Bar's AI Guidance

    Author Photo

    Initial recommendations from the State Bar of California regarding use of generative artificial intelligence by lawyers have the potential to become a useful set of guidelines in the industry, covering confidentiality, supervision and training, communications, discrimination and more, say attorneys at Debevoise.

  • Industry Must Elevate Native American Women Attys' Stories

    Author Photo

    The American Bar Association's recent research study into Native American women attorneys' experiences in the legal industry reveals the glacial pace of progress, and should inform efforts to amplify Native voices in the field, says Mary Smith, president of the ABA.

Want to publish in Law360?


Submit an idea

Have a news tip?


Contact us here
Can't find the article you're looking for? Click here to search the Class Action archive.
Hello! I'm Law360's automated support bot.

How can I help you today?

For example, you can type:
  • I forgot my password
  • I took a free trial but didn't get a verification email
  • How do I sign up for a newsletter?
Ask a question!