Employment

  • April 22, 2024

    Citing Cozen O'Connor Ties, Judge Steps Away From Bias Case

    Despite originally declining to recuse himself from a surgeon's gender discrimination case against Thomas Jefferson University Hospital when an attorney from his son-in-law's firm, Cozen O'Connor, became involved, U.S. District Judge Michael M. Baylson changed his mind now that the case is set for a retrial.

  • April 22, 2024

    Ohio College Settles Athlete's Down-Syndrome Bias Suit

    Ohio's Hocking College has settled a discrimination lawsuit filed by the mother of the first college football player with Down syndrome to score during a game, following accusations his former supervisor at the student recreation center threatened him with a knife.

  • April 22, 2024

    Ga. Pesticide Maker Denies DOL Whistleblower Charges

    A Georgia pesticide maker has denied all wrongdoing after being hit with a U.S. Department of Labor complaint earlier this year that accused the company of firing a whistleblower who complained about her exposure to dangerous chemical fumes.

  • April 22, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Last week, Delaware's Chancery Court news included a Tesla announcement about moving to Texas, a midcase appeal of Tripadvisor's move to Nevada, and United Airlines' escape from a stockholder suit. Disputes about board entrenchment, squeeze-out mergers, co-founder fallouts and deadly ice cream moved ahead.

  • April 22, 2024

    SpaceX Fights NLRB's Structure Again Over Agency Suit

    SpaceX mounted another challenge to the constitutionality of the National Labor Relations Board's structure in Texas federal court, telling the judge to stop administrative proceedings over an unfair labor practice complaint alleging the company's severance agreement is unlawful.

  • April 22, 2024

    High Court Turns Away Ex-HP Worker's Disability Bias Suit

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday refused to take up a former Hewlett Packard employee's challenge to a Fourth Circuit decision finding he wasn't entitled to a jury trial over allegations that he was fired for seeking accommodations to treat an arthritic toe.

  • April 22, 2024

    Thermo Fisher Says Rival Is Raiding Its Workforce

    Thermo Fisher Scientific Inc. is seeking to block Repligen Corp. from hiring one of its top executives, according to a suit in Massachusetts state court accusing the rival of a "systematic raiding" of its workforce.

  • April 22, 2024

    Trulieve Strikes Deal To End Ex-Worker's Whistleblower Suit

    Cannabis company Trulieve reached a deal with a Black former manager to end his suit alleging he was fired after reporting a supervisor's sexual misconduct and several safety violations, a filing in Florida federal court said.

  • April 22, 2024

    Airline Fires Male Pilot Over Earring, Sex Bias Suit Says

    Republic Airways fired a pilot because he wore an earring to work in violation of a company appearance policy that unlawfully discriminates against workers based on gender expression, the pilot told a New York federal court Monday.

  • April 22, 2024

    Supreme Court Denies Amazon Bid To Review Arbitration Scope

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday denied Amazon's bid to review a Ninth Circuit decision on whether last-mile delivery drivers are exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Hear Bakery's Arbitration Exemption Case

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday declined to again examine a carveout to a federal arbitration law for interstate transportation workers, in a case involving baked goods delivery drivers, after already issuing a decision in a similar case.

  • April 22, 2024

    Justices Won't Weigh If Domino's Drivers Arbitration-Exempt

    The U.S. Supreme Court on Monday passed on reviewing whether Domino's Pizza truck drivers are interstate transportation workers who are exempt from federal arbitration requirements, declining to pave the way for a ruling that could have expanded or narrowed the arbitration carveout.

  • April 22, 2024

    GRSM50 Adds Wilson Turner Litigation Vet In San Diego

    Gordon Rees Scully Mansukhani LLP, now known as GRSM50, is expanding its Southern California team, bringing in a Wilson Turner Kosmo LLP employment and class action pro as a partner in San Diego.

  • April 19, 2024

    Wells Fargo Faces Sex Bias Suit Over 'Degrading' Workplace

    A Wells Fargo bond saleswoman sued the bank Friday in Illinois federal court, accusing it of sex discrimination by creating "an unapologetically sexist working environment" and passing her up for promotions despite her years of experience in the investment banking world.

  • April 19, 2024

    Uber, Lyft Ask Justices To Review Calif. Arbitration 'Loophole'

    Uber Technologies and Lyft Inc. asked the U.S. Supreme Court to review a California appellate court's decision rejecting their efforts to force into arbitration coordinated litigation alleging they misclassified drivers as independent contractors, saying the Golden State is trying to "create a loophole" in the Federal Arbitration Act.

  • April 19, 2024

    Timing Of Cigna Workers' Relief Bid Perplexes Conn. Judge

    A Connecticut federal judge wondered Friday if a class of more than 25,000 Cigna workers waited too long to renew a request for an accounting tied to the millions of dollars in underpaid benefits the workers won nearly a decade ago, questioning if the plaintiffs had a right at this stage in the 23-year-old matter to again challenge the company's calculations. 

  • April 19, 2024

    Ex-Lewis Brisbois Atty Accuses Firm Of Bias, Unethical Billing

    A former attorney for Lewis Brisbois Bisgaard & Smith LLP has sued the firm in Los Angeles court, alleging gender discrimination in pay and retaliation for raising concerns over its "unethical billing practices," marking the second discrimination suit filed against the firm since March.

  • April 19, 2024

    Ex-Gibson Dunn Partners Battle Firm Over Sealed Records

    Gibson Dunn & Crutcher LLP is fighting anonymous ex-partners' bid to unseal a contractual arbitration award granted to a former co-chair of the firm's appellate practice, saying the documents contain trade secrets — such as details about the firm's compensation and partnership structure — that other top law firms could exploit to gain an advantage in a competitive recruitment market.

  • April 19, 2024

    Wash. Hospital Workers Can't Replicate Related Wage Win

    A Washington state court ruled Friday that workers of a Seattle-area hospital system still have to prove that their employer's timekeeping and meal break policies violated state law, even though an affiliated healthcare system with policies the employees alleged were "virtually the same" was found liable in a similar case.

  • April 19, 2024

    Judge Mulls Axing Biomedical Cos.' $25M Punitive Damages

    Not enough evidence supports Skye Orthobiologics' $25.5 million punitive damages award against an ex-employee found to have breached his fiduciary duties by leveraging Skye's proprietary information, a California federal judge has ruled, asking for briefing on whether the proper remedy is to cut the damages or grant a new trial.

  • April 19, 2024

    Texas Justices Open Door To Axing $14M Truck Crash Verdict

    What started as a monster $80 million trucking crash verdict but later was reduced to $13.7 million was put in further jeopardy Friday when the Texas Supreme Court found that a lower appeals court erroneously declined to hear challenges to how the injured truck driver's employment status was determined.

  • April 19, 2024

    Calif. Union Plan Pays $2.5M To End Early Retirement Suit

    A pension plan for union-represented Northern California metalworkers, the plan administrator and a law firm will pay roughly $2.5 million to end a proposed class action alleging about 30 early retirees weren't given the full benefits they were promised, according to paperwork filed Friday in California federal court.

  • April 19, 2024

    Employment Authority: Title VII Ruling Unanswered Questions

    Law360 Employment Authority covers the biggest employment cases and trends. Catch up this week with coverage on the unanswered questions the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling that Title VII prohibits discriminatory job transfers left, how lower courts could decide how much transportation work can exempt workers from federal arbitration and a look at a workers' bid to unionize at a Volkswagen facility in Chattanooga, Tennessee.

  • April 19, 2024

    CVS Narrows But Can't End HIV Patients' Disability Bias Suit

    A California federal judge declined to toss a disability bias lawsuit brought by HIV or AIDS patients alleging CVS Pharmacy Inc. made their medication harder to get, saying federal regulations and even an internal company study warned that the program at issue was potentially problematic.

  • April 19, 2024

    Up Next At High Court: Abortions & Presidential Immunity

    The U.S. Supreme Court will return Monday for the term's final week of oral arguments, during which it will consider several high-stakes disputes, including whether a federal healthcare law can preempt state abortion bans and whether former President Donald Trump is entitled to immunity from criminal charges related to official acts.

Expert Analysis

  • The Practical Effects Of Justices' Arbitration Exemption Ruling

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Bissonnette v. LePage Bakeries, that a transportation worker need not work in the transportation industry to be exempt from the Federal Arbitration Act, may negatively affect employers' efforts to mitigate class action risk via arbitration agreement enforcement, say Charles Schoenwetter and Eric Olson at Bowman and Brooke.

  • Highlights From The 2024 ABA Antitrust Spring Meeting

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    U.S. merger enforcement and cartels figured heavily in this year's American Bar Association spring antitrust meeting, where one key takeaway included news that the Federal Trade Commission's anticipated changes to the Hart-Scott-Rodino form may be less dramatic than many originally feared, say attorneys at Freshfields.

  • Why Corporate DEI Challenges Increasingly Cite Section 1981

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    As legal challenges to corporate diversity, equity and inclusion initiatives increase in the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling on race-conscious college admissions last year, Section 1981 of the Civil Rights Act is supplanting Title VII as conservative activist groups' weapon of choice, say Mike Delikat and Tierra Piens at Orrick.

  • The Future Of BIPA Insurance Litigation After Visual Pak

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    A recent Illinois appellate court decision, National Fire Insurance v. Visual Pak, may have altered the future of insurance litigation under the state's Biometric Information Privacy Act by diametrically opposing a prominent Seventh Circuit ruling that found insurance coverage for violations of the act, say attorneys at Jenner & Block.

  • Inside OMB's Update On Race And Ethnicity Data Collection

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    The Office of Management and Budget's new guidelines for agency collection of data on race and ethnicity reflect societal changes and the concerns of certain demographics, but implementation may be significantly burdensome for agencies and employers, say Joanna Colosimo and Bill Osterndorf at DCI Consulting.

  • Assessing Work Rules After NLRB Handbook Ruling

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    The National Labor Relations Board's Stericycle decision last year sparked uncertainty surrounding whether historically acceptable work rules remain lawful — but employers can use a two-step analysis to assess whether to implement a given rule and how to do so in a compliant manner, say attorneys at Seyfarth.

  • Series

    Whitewater Kayaking Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Whether it's seeing clients and their issues from a new perspective, or staying nimble in a moment of intense challenge, the lessons learned from whitewater kayaking transcend the rapids of a river and prepare attorneys for the courtroom and beyond, says Matthew Kent at Alston & Bird.

  • New Wash. Laws Employers Should Pay Attention To

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    The Washington Legislature ended its session last month after passing substantial laws that should prompt employers to spring into action — including a broadened equal pay law to cover classes beyond gender, narrowed sick leave payment requirements for construction workers and protections for grocery workers after a merger, say Hannah Ard and Alayna Piwonski at Lane Powell.

  • Cannabis Ruling Lights Path For Bankruptcy Protection

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    A recent Massachusetts bankruptcy appellate court ruling in Blumsack v. Harrington leaves the door open for those employed in the cannabis industry to seek bankruptcy relief where certain conditions are met, but rescheduling marijuana as a Schedule III drug may complicate matters, say Jane Haviland and Kathryn Droumbakis at Mintz.

  • This Earth Day, Consider How Your Firm Can Go Greener

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    As Earth Day approaches, law firms and attorneys should consider adopting more sustainable practices to reduce their carbon footprint — from minimizing single-use plastics to purchasing carbon offsets for air travel — which ultimately can also reduce costs for clients, say M’Lynn Phillips and Lisa Walters at IMS Legal Strategies.

  • The Shifting Landscape Of Physician Disciplinary Proceedings

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    Though hospitals have historically been able to terminate doctors' medical staff privileges without fear of court interference, recent case law has demonstrated that the tides are turning, especially when there is evidence of unlawful motivations, say Dylan Newton and Michael Horn at Archer & Greiner.

  • Opinion

    Anti-DEI Complaints Filed With EEOC Carry No Legal Weight

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    Recently filed complaints against several companies' diversity, equity and inclusion programs alleging unlawful discrimination against white people do not require a response from the U.S. Equal Employment Opportunity Commission, and should not stop employers from rooting out ongoing discriminatory practices, says former EEOC general counsel David Lopez.

  • Circumstantial Evidence Requires A Pointillist Approach

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    Because complex cases with sophisticated defendants are unlikely to reveal much, if any, direct evidence, attorneys must aggregate many pieces of circumstantial evidence into a cohesive narrative — much like the painting technique of pointillism, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • A Look At Global Employee Disconnect Laws For US Counsel

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    As countries worldwide adopt employee right to disconnect laws, U.S. in-house counsel at corporations with a global workforce must develop a comprehensive understanding of the laws' legal and cultural implications, ensuring their companies can safeguard employee welfare while maintaining legal compliance, say Emma Corcoran and Ute Krudewagen at DLA Piper.

  • How DEI Programs Are Being Challenged In Court And Beyond

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's affirmative action decision last year declaring the consideration of race in university admissions unconstitutional, employers should keep abreast of recent litigation challenging diversity, equity and inclusion training programs, as well as legislation both supporting and opposing DEI initiatives in the workplace, say attorneys at Skadden.

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