Native American

  • February 27, 2024

    Hospital Groups Allege Opioid Crisis Damaged Their Finances

    More than 20 hospitals and related companies have joined multidistrict litigation over the opioid epidemic, alleging in a massive new complaint that pharmacies, drug distributors and others contributed to a crisis that damaged hospitals' finances and strained their ability to help patients.

  • February 27, 2024

    States, Businesses Aim To Kill Feds' Revised Water Rule

    States and business groups have asked a North Dakota federal judge to force the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to revise regulations intended to define the scope of the federal government's authority under the Clean Water Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Salmon Fishing Mitigation Effort Is Absent, Green Group Says

    Conservation group Wild Fish Conservancy told the Ninth Circuit the district court did not abuse its discretion in "narrowly partially vacating" an incidental take statement underpinning a Chinook salmon troll fishery in southeast Alaska, saying the overarching biological opinion is inconsistent with the Endangered Species Act.

  • February 27, 2024

    Energy Co. Asks 8th Circ. To Revive Lease Termination Suit

    A Denver-based energy company has told the Eighth Circuit that a North Dakota federal judge was wrong to dismiss its lease termination suit and hold that it had not exhausted its administrative remedies when its appeal of the Bureau of Indian Affairs decision had dragged on for nine-plus years.

  • February 26, 2024

    EPA Must Act On Failed Skagit River Temps Plan, Tribe Says

    The Swinomish Indian Tribal Community said it plans to sue the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency for Endangered Species Act violations unless it revisits a failed Washington state plan to address high water temperatures in the Lower Skagit River Basin that are harming protected salmon species.

  • February 26, 2024

    Gas Groups Press DOE To Restart LNG Export Reviews

    Oil and gas industry groups on Monday urged the U.S. Department of Energy to lift its recent pause of approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the United States, arguing that the move is illegal.

  • February 26, 2024

    Hydroelectric Co. Asks For Pause On Puyallup Dam Order

    A hydroelectric company appealing to the Ninth Circuit is asking a Washington federal judge to stay an order that directed it to remove part of a temporary rock dam on the Puyallup River, saying the order would require it to make changes that are likely to damage its facility.

  • February 26, 2024

    Justices Say Tribes Can Argue Separately In Healthcare Row

    Two Native American tribes seeking to uphold rulings that ordered the federal government to reimburse them millions of dollars in administrative healthcare costs can argue their cases separately, the U.S. Supreme Court said Monday.

  • February 23, 2024

    SD Bill To Expand Native Voting Rights Put Off To Next Session

    A South Dakota bill aimed at expanding and protecting the voting rights of Native Americans was tabled on Friday when state lawmakers ran out of time to consider the legislation with questions lingering on how to craft its language to ensure compliance with state and federal voting rights laws.

  • February 23, 2024

    Wildlife, Paddling Groups Want To Join Clean Water Act Fight

    The National Wildlife Federation and American Whitewater are asking a Louisiana federal judge to let them join litigation over an updated Clean Water Act rule that expanded states' and tribes' ability to block projects such as pipelines and dams over water quality concerns, to ensure their interests are considered.

  • February 23, 2024

    Tribal Biz Atty Must Meet Calif. DA Over Greenhouse Wreckage

    A California federal judge has ordered the lawyer for a business owned by a tribal conglomerate to attend a hearing with San Bernardino County's district attorney, saying the lawyer must explain why he forced the DA to file a unilateral status report about the destruction of illegal cannabis greenhouses.

  • February 23, 2024

    Enviro Orgs. Target Sequoia Forest Restoration Projects

    Several conservation groups are asking a California federal judge to overturn U.S. Forest Service approvals for two post-fire forest restoration projects on parts of the Giant Sequoia National Monument and Sequoia National Forest, claiming they risk harming the sensitive landscapes and making matters worse.

  • February 23, 2024

    Alaska Judge Won't Disturb Oil, Gas Lease Moratorium Order

    An Alaska federal judge rejected bids by the state's development authority to amend or vacate an order upholding a temporary moratorium the Biden administration imposed on an Arctic National Wildlife Refuge Coastal Plain oil and gas program, holding that the case isn't moot after the government canceled its leases.

  • February 22, 2024

    Wash. Tribe Awarded Land Comp Funds After 50-Year Battle

    In a decision the Chinook Indian Nation on Thursday called groundbreaking for other Indigenous communities, the federal government determined that the tribe will receive more than $48,000 from an Indian Claims Commission judgment handed down half a century ago as compensation for the seizure of the tribe's ancestral lands.

  • February 22, 2024

    EPA Puts $5.8B On Tap For Water Infrastructure Projects

    The Biden administration said it's making $5.8 billion available to help pay for water projects around the U.S., steering millions of dollars to states and territories to help overhaul drinking water infrastructure, and wastewater and stormwater systems.

  • February 22, 2024

    Tribal Co., Minn. Agree To Settle Interest Rate Overcharge Row

    Minnesota officials and Montana's Fort Belknap Indian Community have agreed to settle claims that the tribe's economic development corporation engaged in predatory lending practices by charging interest rates up to 800% on loans to thousands of state residents.

  • February 22, 2024

    San Antonio Can Scare Off Park Birds For Now, 5th Circ. Says

    The Fifth Circuit said San Antonio, Texas, can move ahead with its bird deterrence program at a park where Native American church members claim the city is violating their religious rights by pursuing renovation plans that will harm a sacred area's spiritual ecology by removing trees and driving off nesting cormorants.

  • February 22, 2024

    Sports & Betting Group Of The Year: Jenner & Block

    Jenner & Block LLP helps its clients navigate critical moments, including guiding Caesars to victory over a change-skimming lawsuit and engineering a multibillion-dollar sports betting arbitration win for Fox FSG Services in a spat with FanDuel, earning the firm a spot among Law360's 2023 Sports & Betting Groups of the Year.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tribes Say Oil Co. Must Face Tribal Court In $12M Award Fight

    Two Native American tribes have asked a Wyoming district court to block a bid by Merit Energy attempting to stop them from using their tribal judicial system to vacate a $12.6 million arbitration award, saying the company has not yet exhausted all tribal remedies.

  • February 21, 2024

    Alaska Tribes Seek Rights Declaration Over BC Gold Mines

    A consortium of southeast Alaska tribes is asking the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights to hold an investigative hearing and declare that Canada is violating their human rights by considering and approving mines that threaten to pollute cross-border rivers and harm vital salmon fisheries without seeking the tribes' input or consent.

  • February 21, 2024

    9th Circ. Says Federal Coal Lease Ban Case 'Is Moot'

    A Ninth Circuit panel on Wednesday vacated and remanded a district court's ruling that had reinstated a 2016 moratorium on federal coal leasing, with a recommendation that the litigation be dismissed as moot, saying there's no basis to conclude that a challenge to a defunct order is still alive.

  • February 21, 2024

    BIA Must Litigate Mont. Tribes' Trimmed Police Funding Suit

    A federal district judge partially dismissed claims in a lawsuit filed by two Montana tribes seeking to gain $3.8 million in additional police funding for their communities after they alleged the U.S. Department of the Interior kept their law enforcement budget at nearly the same level it was 25 years ago.

  • February 21, 2024

    Tribes, Mich., Feds Refute Great Lakes Fishing Challenge

    Several Native American tribes, the state of Michigan and the federal government have urged the Sixth Circuit to reject a sport fishing group's attempt to sink a tribal fishing pact for parts of lakes Huron, Michigan and Superior, arguing it strikes an appropriate balance between respecting tribal fishing rights and protecting the Great Lakes fisheries.

  • February 21, 2024

    Ga. Urges Judge To Reject DOJ Bid To Join Voting Rights Suit

    Georgia officials want a Peach State federal court to reject the Biden administration's delayed attempt to join a lawsuit alleging a recent state election law discriminates against Black voters, arguing the move is driven by the government's concern about losing its own challenge to the state's voting rules.

  • February 21, 2024

    FCC Considers Adding Missing Persons To Emergency Alerts

    The Federal Communications Commission plans to introduce a new code to the Emergency Alert System to allow information about missing or endangered persons to be widely disseminated.

Expert Analysis

  • In-Office Engagement Is Essential To Associate Development

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    As law firms develop return-to-office policies that allow hybrid work arrangements, they should incorporate the specific types of in-person engagement likely to help associates develop attributes common among successful firm leaders, says Liisa Thomas at Sheppard Mullin.

  • Perspectives

    A Judge's Pitch To Revive The Jury Trial

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    Ohio state Judge Pierre Bergeron explains how the decline of the jury trial threatens public confidence in the judiciary and even democracy as a whole, and he offers ideas to restore this sacred right.

  • How To Recognize And Recover From Lawyer Loneliness

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    Law can be one of the loneliest professions, but there are practical steps that attorneys and their managers can take to help themselves and their peers improve their emotional health, strengthen their social bonds and protect their performance, says psychologist and attorney Traci Cipriano.

  • Opinion

    Litigation Funding Disclosure Should Be Mandatory

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    Despite the Appellate Rules Committee's recent deferral of the issue of requiring third-party litigation funding disclosure, such a mandate is necessary to ensure the even-handed administration of justice across all cases, says David Levitt at Hinshaw.

  • Recalling USWNT's Legal PR Playbook Amid World Cup Bid

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    As the U.S. Women's National Soccer Team strives to take home another World Cup trophy, their 2022 pay equity settlement with the U.S. Soccer Federation serves as a good reminder that winning in the court of public opinion can be more powerful than a victory inside the courtroom, says Hector Valle at Vianovo.

  • Assessing EPA's Potential Retreat On Title VI Enforcement

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's decision to close its Title VI investigation of Louisiana — rather than respond to the state's litigation challenge against it — raises questions about the efficacy of the agency's plans to use Title VI in support of its environmental justice initiatives, say Susan Richardson and Jeffrey Davidson at Kilpatrick Townsend.

  • High Court's Tribal Water Rights Ruling Steadies The Boat

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    The U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Arizona v. Navajo Nation — concerning the federal government's obligations to help secure tribal access to water — overturns a Ninth Circuit decision that could have undermined existing state adjudication processes and unleashed a wave of tribal water rights claims, say attorneys at Perkins Coie.

  • Perspectives

    Mallory Gives Plaintiffs A Better Shot At Justice

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    Critics of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent decision in Mallory v. Norfolk Southern claim it opens the door to litigation tourism, but the ruling simply gives plaintiffs more options — enabling them to seek justice against major corporations in the best possible court, say Rayna Kessler and Ethan Seidenberg at Robins Kaplan.

  • Why Seminole Tribe Sports Betting Ruling Is A Net Positive

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    The D.C. Circuit Court’s recent ruling that a gambling compact between Florida and the Seminole Tribe is lawful even though it allows for online sports betting expands the tribe's offerings while maintaining exclusivity and is a win for individuals who wish to legally wager on sports within Florida, says Daniel McGinn at Dean Mead.

  • Courts Can Overturn Deficient State Regulations, Too

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    While suits challenging federal regulations have become commonplace, such cases against state agencies are virtually nonexistent, but many states have provisions that allow litigants to bring suit for regulations with inadequate cost-benefit analyses, says Reeve Bull at the Virginia Office of Regulatory Management.

  • Tales From The Trenches Of Remote Depositions

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    As practitioners continue to conduct depositions remotely in the post-pandemic world, these virtual environments are rife with opportunities for improper behavior such as witness coaching, scripted testimony and a general lack of civility — but there are methods to prevent and combat these behaviors, say Jennifer Gibbs and Bennett Moss at Zelle.

  • Opinion

    The Case For Seating The Cherokee Nation's Delegate

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    The U.S. government should follow through on its obligation to seat a delegate from the Cherokee Nation in the U.S. House of Representatives, as explicitly promised in a treaty ratified nearly 200 years ago, says Jack Baker at the National Trail of Tears Association.

  • Sackett Ruling, 'Waters' Rule Fix Won't Dry Up Wetlands Suits

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    In the wake of the U.S. Supreme Court's recent ruling in Sackett v. U.S. Environmental Protection Agency narrowing the scope of Clean Water Act protections, the Biden administration is amending its rule defining "waters of the United States" — but the revised rule will inevitably face further court challenges, continuing the WOTUS legal saga indefinitely, say attorneys at Milbank.

  • Bid Protest Spotlight: Errors, Experience, Corrective Action

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    In this month's bid protest spotlight, Krista Nunez at MoFo looks at three recent decisions from the U.S. Court of Federal Claims and the U.S. Government Accountability Office considering the resolution of proposal inconsistencies through clarifications, the importance of reading solicitations in full and the scope of an agency’s corrective action.

  • Minn. Mine Denial Stresses Importance Of Tribal Partnerships

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    The Army Corps of Engineers' decision to revoke a suspended Clean Water Act permit for a proposed mine in Minnesota is a reminder that project developers need to take tribal authority and rights seriously and consider early and frequent consultation with tribes, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

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