Native American

  • January 30, 2024

    Tribe's Repeat Default Bids Disrespect Court, Blue Cross Says

    Blue Cross Blue Shield of Michigan says a Native American tribe's third request for a default win in its suit alleging the insurer overcharged for tribe members' care is disrespectful and constitutes a continued violation of a court order for the tribe to identify members involved in the insurance plan.

  • January 30, 2024

    Feds, Tesoro Question Landowners' Bid To Join Pipeline Fight

    The U.S. government has told a North Dakota federal judge that tribal landowners' push to join a pipeline fight with Tesoro High Plains Pipeline Co. LLC may be premature, while the company said it threatens to turn its litigation against the government "into a circus."

  • January 29, 2024

    Green Groups Oppose Extension Of Mont. Coal Mine Analysis

    Conservation groups are fighting the U.S. government's bid for more time to correct a faulty environmental analysis of a coal strip mine expansion near the city of Colstrip, Montana, arguing that a federal court already said it would halt mining if changes weren't made within 19 months.

  • January 29, 2024

    No Need To Stop Salmon Fishing To Help Orcas, 9th Circ. Told

    Alaska, the U.S. government and a fishing trade group are all urging the Ninth Circuit to reverse a lower court ruling vacating an incidental take statement underpinning a Chinook salmon troll fishery in southeast Alaska, arguing the district court inflated questionable benefits to prey availability for endangered killer whales and failed to consider harms to Alaska communities.

  • January 29, 2024

    Justices Set March Arguments In Tribal Healthcare Dispute

    The U.S. Supreme Court will hear arguments in March on two federal government petitions seeking to overturn orders that have the potential to cost $2 billion a year to support Native American tribes that provide insurer-funded services to their members.

  • January 29, 2024

    ND Assembly Can't Intervene In VRA Appeal, 8th Circ. Says

    The North Dakota Legislative Assembly can't intervene in an appeal by Secretary of State Micheal Howe seeking to overturn a lower court's ruling that found the government body's redrawing of districts violated Section 2 of the Voting Rights Act, the Eighth Circuit said.

  • January 26, 2024

    Museums Cover Native Exhibits In Renewed Repatriation Push

    Museums and other institutions throughout the country are covering exhibits that display Indigenous artifacts as updates to a federal law governing the repatriation of remains and culturally affiliated objects has gone into effect.

  • January 26, 2024

    Biden Stokes LNG Uncertainty With Export Review Pause

    The Biden administration's pause of its approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the U.S. will delay several projects and have potential customers question whether their supply agreements can ultimately be honored.

  • January 26, 2024

    Oglala Sioux File Suit For More Law Enforcement Funding

    The Oglala Sioux Tribe has accused the U.S. government of failing to help it hire enough law enforcement officers on the Pine Ridge Indian Reservation, saying in a South Dakota federal lawsuit that the U.S. Department of the Interior must adhere to its treaty and trust responsibilities.

  • January 26, 2024

    Judge OKs Consent Decree In Nebraska Tribe's VRA Dispute

    A federal judge will allow a consent decree that will resolve Voting Rights Act violation claims brought by two Native American tribes against Thurston County, Nebraska, officials to go forward, saying the settlement reasonably resolves difficult voting rights issues in a manner that is fair to all parties.

  • January 26, 2024

    Feds Lodge Decree, CWA Claims Against Idaho Sawmill

    A PotlatchDeltic Corp. unit will pay $225,000 to resolve a dozen Clean Water Act claims stemming from permit violations at an Idaho sawmill and lumberyard, involving discharges of stormwater pollutants into designated bull trout habitat and waters of the Coeur d'Alene Tribe, according to a federal complaint and proposed consent decree.

  • January 26, 2024

    Enviro Org., Feds Seek Wins In Mid-Atlantic Fishery Reg Fight

    The Natural Resources Defense Council and U.S. government are squaring off over summer flounder, black sea bass and scup fishing regulations for mid-Atlantic states, with the former telling a D.C. federal judge they unlawfully allow overfishing while the latter claims they are appropriate changes to address recreational fishing management challenges.

  • February 08, 2024

    Law360 Seeks Members For Its 2024 Editorial Boards

    Law360 is looking for avid readers of its publications to serve as members of its 2024 editorial advisory boards.

  • January 26, 2024

    Don't Tax Broadband Deployment Money, Telecom Groups Say

    A group of telecommunications trade associations are asking Congress to grant their members tax breaks for broadband deployment costs, saying that without the proposed legislation, money intended to help bring broadband to currently out-of-reach households would return to the government in tax payments.

  • January 26, 2024

    Biden Admin Pauses LNG Reviews Over Climate Concerns

    The Biden administration on Friday said it would pause its approvals of liquefied natural gas exports to countries that don't have free-trade agreements with the U.S., and revise its export policy to greater account for LNG's impacts on climate change and energy prices.

  • January 25, 2024

    Opioid Nuisance Query Better For W.Va. Court, 4th Circ. Hints

    A Fourth Circuit panel asked repeatedly Thursday why no one had sought help from West Virginia's high court in a bellwether legal clash over whether anti-nuisance laws can be used to target the drug companies that supplied pharmacies amid the opioid crisis.

  • January 25, 2024

    Seattle Settles BLM Protesters' Police Brutality Suit For $10M

    The city of Seattle has agreed to a $10 million settlement to end a lawsuit brought by more than 50 protesters who say they were brutalized by its police force during Black Lives Matter demonstrations in the summer of 2020.

  • January 25, 2024

    ACLU Says Native American Inmate Denied Religious Rights

    The ACLU of Rhode Island is asking a federal district court for an order that will allow a Native American inmate to wear an Apache headband as part of his religious beliefs, arguing in a lawsuit that the state's Department of Corrections' refusal of the requests violates his rights under federal law designed to protect the religious freedom of incarcerated individuals.

  • January 25, 2024

    States, Industry Back Feds' Land Swap Fight At 9th Circ.

    The states of Idaho and Utah, the U.S. Chamber of Commerce and the National Mining Association have joined the federal government in urging the Ninth Circuit to overturn a lower court ruling in favor of the Shoshone-Bannock Tribes' challenge to a land transfer intended for the expansion of a fertilizer plant.

  • January 25, 2024

    Alaskan Guide Co. To Pay $900K For Fire On Native Lands

    An Alaskan fishing guide service will pay $900,000 to resolve claims brought by the U.S. Department of the Interior accusing one of its guides of lighting an illegal campfire that ultimately burned through 176 acres of Native and federal public lands, according to the U.S. Department of Justice.

  • January 25, 2024

    Calif. Judge Says States' Trump Water Rule Challenge Is Moot

    A California federal judge dismissed Democrat-led states' challenge to a Trump-era Clean Water Act rule the Biden administration has since replaced, saying because there is no present controversy, the case is moot.

  • January 25, 2024

    Judge Won't Revisit Stay Issued In Gila River Water Fight

    An Arizona federal judge said the U.S. government, San Carlos Apache Tribe and Gila Indian River Community failed to convince him to reverse a decision to deny their summary judgment motions and hit pause on a suit over Gila River water usage.

  • January 24, 2024

    J&J Agrees To $150M Deal Ending Wash. Opioid Litigation

    Johnson & Johnson will pay almost $150 million to end Washington's lawsuit accusing it of pushing opioid painkillers and understating the risk of addiction, according to a settlement filed in state court on Wednesday, adding to the tally of states that have gotten a payout from the pharmaceutical giant for its alleged role in the opioid epidemic. 

  • January 24, 2024

    Bid To Swap Chevron For An Old Standby Raises Doubts

    Last week, the U.S. Supreme Court debated whether a World War II-era doctrine encouraging courts to strongly consider agency statutory interpretations could replace the court's controversial so-called Chevron doctrine that requires judges to defer to those interpretations if a statute is ambiguous.

  • January 24, 2024

    Enviro, Tribal Orgs. Claim Calif. Botched Delta Tunnel Reviews

    Conservation groups are taking aim at the California Department of Water Resources' review and approval of the Delta Conveyance Project, claiming it glossed over harms that would stem from an estimated $16 billion push to augment the State Water Project with a 45-mile water diversion tunnel under the Sacramento-San Joaquin Delta.

Expert Analysis

  • Attorneys, Law Schools Must Adapt To New Era Of Evidence

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    Technological advancements mean more direct evidence is being created than ever before, and attorneys as well as law schools must modify their methods to account for new challenges in how this evidence is collected and used to try cases, says Reuben Guttman at Guttman Buschner.

  • Tips For Litigating Against Pro Se Parties In Complex Disputes

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    Litigating against self-represented parties in complex cases can pose unique challenges for attorneys, but for the most part, it requires the same skills that are useful in other cases — from documenting everything to understanding one’s ethical duties, says Bryan Ketroser at Alto Litigation.

  • New Initiatives Will Advance Corporate Biodiversity Reporting

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    Two important recent developments — the launch of the Taskforce on Nature-related Financial Disclosures' framework on nature and biodiversity reporting, and Nature Action 100's announcement of the 100 companies it plans to engage on biodiversity issues — will help bring biodiversity disclosures into the mainstream, say David Woodcock and Maria Banda at Gibson Dunn.

  • Pro Bono Work Is Powerful Self-Help For Attorneys

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    Oct. 22-28 is Pro Bono Week, serving as a useful reminder that offering free legal help to the public can help attorneys expand their legal toolbox, forge community relationships and create human connections, despite the challenges of this kind of work, says Orlando Lopez at Culhane Meadows.

  • Series

    Playing In A Rock Cover Band Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    Performing in a classic rock cover band has driven me to hone several skills — including focus, organization and networking — that have benefited my professional development, demonstrating that taking time to follow your muse outside of work can be a boon to your career, says Michael Gambro at Cadwalader.

  • Series

    The Pop Culture Docket: Judge Espinosa On 'Lincoln Lawyer'

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    The murder trials in Netflix’s “The Lincoln Lawyer” illustrate the stark contrast between the ethical high ground that fosters and maintains the criminal justice system's integrity, and the ethical abyss that can undermine it, with an important reminder for all legal practitioners, say Judge Adam Espinosa and Andrew Howard at the Colorado 2nd Judicial District Court.

  • Opinion

    Newman Suspension Shows Need For Judicial Reform

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    The recent suspension of U.S. Circuit Judge Pauline Newman following her alleged refusal to participate in a disability inquiry reveals the need for judicial misconduct reforms to ensure that judges step down when they can no longer serve effectively, says Aliza Shatzman at The Legal Accountability Project.

  • Extreme Weather And Renewable Project Insurance Coverage

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    The regularity and severity of extreme weather events driven by climate change are putting renewable energy projects increasingly at risk — so project owners, contractors and investors should understand the issues that can arise in these situations when seeking recovery under a builder's risk insurance policy, say Paul Ferland and Joshua Tumen at Cozen O'Connor.

  • How And Why Your Firm Should Implement Fixed-Fee Billing

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    Amid rising burnout in the legal industry and client efforts to curtail spending, pivoting to a fixed-fee billing model may improve client-attorney relationships and offer lawyers financial, logistical and stress relief — while still maintaining profit margins, say Kevin Henderson and Eric Pacifici at SMB Law Group.

  • Unpacking OMB's Proposed Uniform Guidance Rewrite

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    Affected organizations, including state and local governments, should carefully review the Office of Management and Budget's proposed overhaul of uniform rules for administering over $1 trillion in federal funding distributed each year, and take the opportunity to submit comments before the December deadline, says Dismas Locaria at Venable.

  • Opinion

    Judicial Independence Needs Defense Amid Political Threats

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    Amid recent and historic challenges to the judiciary from political forces, safeguarding judicial independence and maintaining the integrity of the legal system is increasingly urgent, says Robert Peck at the Center for Constitutional Litigation.

  • How Law Firms Can Use Account-Based Marketing Strategies

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    Amid several evolving legal industry trends, account-based marketing can help law firms uncover additional revenue-generating opportunities with existing clients, with key considerations ranging from data analytics to relationship building, say Jennifer Ramsey at stage LLC and consultant Gina Sponzilli.

  • Strategic Succession Planning At Law Firms Is Crucial

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    Senior partners' reluctance to retire, the rise of the nonequity partner tier and generational differences in expectations are all contributing to an increasing number of departures from BigLaw, making it imperative for firms to encourage retirement among senior ranks and provide clearer leadership pathways to junior attorneys, says Laura Leopard at Leopard Solutions.

  • Maximizing Law Firm Profitability In Uncertain Times

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    As threats of an economic downturn loom, firms can boost profits by embracing the power of bottom-line management and creating an ecosystem where strategic financial oversight and robust timekeeping practices meet evolved client relations, says Shireen Hilal at Maior Strategic Consulting.

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

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