Native American

  • January 04, 2024

    Native Group Dismissed From NFL Conspiracy Litigation

    A federal district court judge on Thursday agreed to dismiss the National Congress of American Indians from litigation brought by a Native American activist group while keeping the $1.6 million defamation and civil conspiracy bid against Washington Commanders' owner Josh Harris and premium sales manager Matthew Laux in play.

  • January 04, 2024

    Feds Defend Right To Sink States' Rio Grande Water Deal

    The U.S. government told the nation's top court that approval of a proposed arrangement to settle long-running Rio Grande water disputes between Texas, New Mexico and Colorado would improperly extinguish its claims against one of the states, impose new burdens and overstep their original compact.

  • January 03, 2024

    SD Tribe Says Feds Still Aren't Following Police Funding Order

    The federal government is violating a court order by refusing to help the Oglala Sioux Tribe revise its funding requests to reflect a South Dakota federal judge's finding that the government has a duty to support law enforcement on the tribe's reservation, the Oglala Sioux claimed in its bid to enforce the order.

  • January 03, 2024

    Seneca Nation Suit Over NY Thruway Headed For Mediation

    A federal district court judge has agreed to extend the deadlines for motions in a long-running challenge by the Seneca Nation to New York over a portion of the state's thruway that runs through the federally recognized tribe's reservation land after the parties said they have agreed to pursue mediation.

  • January 03, 2024

    ND Residents Intend To Take VRA Dispute To High Court

    Two North Dakota residents want the U.S. Supreme Court to overturn a federal district court ruling that determined that two of the state's new House subdistricts, created to prevent Native American voter dilution, were legally drawn along the boundaries of the Fort Berthold and Turtle Mountain Indian reservations.

  • January 03, 2024

    Native Veterans Group To Receive Congressional Charter

    Included in the annual defense policy act for fiscal 2024 is a congressional charter for the National American Indian Veterans organization, which will be the first veterans group for indigenous Americans to receive the congressional recognition.

  • January 02, 2024

    ND Assembly Seeks More Time To Redraw Election Map

    North Dakota's Legislative Assembly wants a federal district court to deny two tribes' request for the adoption of a remedial redistricting map after the lawmakers missed a Dec. 22 deadline to correct Voting Rights Act violations, arguing there's no reason to impose a remedial map amid work toward a solution.

  • January 02, 2024

    Fla. Says Tribe Misreads 'Indian Lands' In Water Permit Suit

    Florida has once again urged a federal judge to hand it a win in a tribe's lawsuit challenging the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's approval of the state's effort to take over a Clean Water Act permitting program, arguing that the tribe's theory of "Indian lands" is wrong.

  • January 02, 2024

    EPA's New Maui Guidance Draws Requests For More Clarity

    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency has released guidance clarifying how to comply with an important U.S. Supreme Court decision regarding Clean Water Act permits for groundwater pollution, but states, industry groups and environmental organizations say there's still room for better, more detailed explanations of key issues.

  • January 02, 2024

    Feds Lose Bid To End Kids' Climate Suit

    An Oregon federal judge largely rejected the U.S. government's attempt to dismiss a lawsuit by young people who accuse it of violating their constitutional rights with harmful fossil fuel energy policies worsening the climate crisis, teeing the matter up for a potential trial.

  • January 02, 2024

    Catching Up With Delaware's Chancery Court

    Delaware's busy Court of Chancery barely stopped to take a break at the end of 2023, keeping the courtroom open for hearings on Carvana and Meta, pushing out year-end decisions related to Fox Corp., Oracle and AmerisourceBergen, and making way for new cases involving biomedical venture SomaLogic Inc., U.S. Bancorp, and Capital Square Partners merger target Startek Inc.

  • January 02, 2024

    Navy Federal Accused Of Bias Against Minority Borrowers

    Navy Federal Credit Union was hit with a proposed class action in Virginia accusing it of discriminating against racial minorities when it denied mortgage applications that would have been approved for similarly situated white Americans.

  • January 01, 2024

    5 Supreme Court Cases To Watch This Spring

    "Blockbuster," "momentous" and "historic" are all words that have been used to describe the U.S. Supreme Court's current term as the justices prepare for a spring docket jam-packed with questions over the level of deference courts should give federal agencies, whether and how social media companies should be regulated and whether government efforts to combat misinformation crosses the line between persuasion and coercion.

  • January 01, 2024

    10 Sports And Betting Cases To Watch In 2024

    An ever-increasing volume of lawsuits involving the NCAA highlights the list of sports and betting cases to watch in 2024, including battles over athletes' right to compensation for their name, image and likeness and their fight to collectively bargain and be designated as employees. Plus, racial discrimination suits against the NFL, and more. Here, Law360 looks at the top sports and betting cases the legal world will be watching in the new year.

  • January 01, 2024

    Energy Legislation And Regulation To Watch In 2024

    While a looming presidential election means that significant Congressional action on energy policy likely isn't in the cards, there are big-ticket regulatory items that are poised to cross the finish line. Here are several legislative and regulatory moves that energy attorneys will be watching in 2024.

  • January 01, 2024

    Biggest Environmental Regulations To Watch In 2024

    As President Joe Biden's term draws to a close in 2024, executive branch agencies won't slow down their efforts to finalize important environmental regulations, from new controls on greenhouse gas emissions at power plants to stricter Endangered Species Act protections and chemical standards.

  • January 01, 2024

    Biggest Environmental Cases To Watch In 2024

    Game-changing environmental law decisions are on tap for 2024, from two U.S. Supreme Court cases that could make important changes to the practice of administrative law to more rulings on the extent of the federal government's jurisdiction under the Clean Water Act.

  • January 01, 2024

    The Biggest Cases To Watch In Native American Law This Year

    Disputes over administrative healthcare costs for tribes that could cost the federal government billions and Voting Rights Act cases that have the potential to undo rulings in several states all gained speed in 2023 with legal experts predicting major decisions out of the appellate courts in the new year.

  • December 22, 2023

    Utah Tribe Asks Gorsuch For Stay In $300K Sanctions Ruling

    A Utah tribe and its affiliated corporations asked U.S. Supreme Court Justice Neil Gorsuch on Friday for an emergency stay on a mandate requiring them to pay more than $300,000 in attorney fee sanctions while they prepare an appeal.

  • December 22, 2023

    IRS Launches Prefiling Tool For Monetizing Energy Credits

    The Internal Revenue Service announced the launch of a tool Friday that's intended to simplify the process that lets businesses and other entities receive certain manufacturing, clean energy and production tax credits.

  • December 21, 2023

    8th Circ. Won't Extend ND's Deadline To Comply With VRA

    The North Dakota Legislative Assembly's bid to extend a deadline to submit a plan that will remedy Voting Rights Act violations would be better served in federal district court, the Eighth Circuit has ruled.

  • December 21, 2023

    Montana Camp Operator Seeks Stay In Tribal Lease Dispute

    A Montana campground operator is asking a federal district court for a stay on an order that found in favor of the Blackfeet Indian Nation in a decadelong land lease dispute, saying the ruling will likely cause it to liquidate its assets before an appeal on the issue is resolved.

  • December 21, 2023

    The Telecom Developments That Defined 2023

    The Federal Communications Commission advanced several new pro-consumer rules under a new Democratic majority in 2023, but was held back in its efforts to deploy more broadband by a lapse in spectrum auction authority and a looming depletion of a major broadband subsidy.

  • December 21, 2023

    Feds, Osage Nation See Win In Wind Farm 'Mining' Row

    A federal judge in Oklahoma largely granted summary judgment to the U.S. government and Osage Nation in their long-running wind farm dispute with Enel Green Power North America Inc. and two subsidiaries, and ordered the ejectment of 84 wind turbines after the companies failed for years to get a required mineral lease.

  • December 21, 2023

    The Biggest Environmental Law Cases Of 2023

    From a Supreme Court decision reshaping water rights in the United States to ongoing fights over so-called forever chemical contamination, lawsuits concerning the environment rumbled through the courts in 2023. Here, we look at the lawsuits that shaped the year.

Expert Analysis

  • EPA Draft Plastic Pollution Plan Offers Opportunities For Cos.

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    The U.S. Environmental Protection Agency's recently released draft national strategy to prevent plastic pollution, if implemented as is, will have serious implications for waste collection and processing businesses, but also highlights growth opportunities for companies seeking to capitalize on the emerging circular economy, say attorneys at DLA Piper.

  • 4 Legal Issues Grant-Funded Broadband Projects May Face

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    The Biden administration's recently announced funding allocations represent the largest ever government investment in broadband internet infrastructure, but these new development opportunities will require navigation of complicated and sometimes arcane legal environments, says Casey Lide at Keller & Heckman.

  • 5 Ways Firms Can Rethink Office Design In A Hybrid World

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    As workplaces across the country adapt to flexible work, law firms must prioritize individuality, amenities and technology in office design, says Kristin Cerutti at Nelson Worldwide.

  • Opinion

    Bar Score Is Best Hiring Metric Post-Affirmative Action

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    After the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling striking down affirmative action admissions policies, law firms looking to foster diversity in hiring should view an applicant's Multistate Bar Examination score as the best metric of legal ability — over law school name or GPA, says attorney Alice Griffin.

  • Ghosting In BigLaw: How To Come Back From Lack Of Feedback

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    Junior associates can feel powerless when senior colleagues cut off contact instead of providing useful feedback, but young attorneys can get back on track by focusing on practical professional development and reexamining their career priorities, says Rachel Patterson at Orrick.

  • Washington State Puts Environmental Justice At The Forefront

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    Two laws — the Healthy Environment for All Act and the Climate Commitment Act — have given Washington one of the most progressive environmental justice frameworks of any state in the country, and the resulting regulatory framework, which became fully effective on July 1, makes environmental justice assessments a key part of many projects, say attorneys at K&L Gates.

  • Steps To Success For Senior Associates

    Excerpt from Practical Guidance
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    Adriana Paris at Rissman Barrett discusses the increased responsibilities and opportunities that becoming a senior associate brings and what attorneys in this role should prioritize to flourish in this stressful but rewarding next level in their careers.

  • Legal Profession Must Do More For Lawyers With Disabilities

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    At the start of Disability Pride month, Rosalyn Richter at Arnold & Porter looks at why lawyers with disabilities are significantly underrepresented in private practice, asserting that law firms and other employers must do more to conquer the implicit bias that deters attorneys from seeking accommodations.

  • Is There A New 'Moderate Questions' Doctrine?

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent Heating v. EPA decision signals that courts may begin to approach agency reliance on general statutory authorization with skepticism similar to the "major questions" doctrine the U.S. Supreme Court announced in West Virginia v. EPA last year, even in less major cases, says Jason Neal at HWG.

  • DC Circ.'s Perchlorate Ruling Means Regulatory Restart

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    The D.C. Circuit's recent ruling in National Resources Defense Council v. Regan, requiring the U.S. Environmental Protection Agency to regulate perchlorate under the Safe Drinking Water Act, reopens a decadeslong regulatory debate and creates renewed uncertainty for companies, say attorneys at Alston & Bird.

  • Opinion

    Appellate Funding Disclosure: No Mandate Is Right Choice

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    The Advisory Committee on Appellate Rules' recent decision, forgoing a mandatory disclosure rule for litigation funding in federal appeals, is prudent, as third-party funding is only involved in a minuscule number of federal cases, and courts have ample authority to obtain funding information if necessary, says Stewart Ackerly at Statera Capital.

  • The Road Ahead For EPA's Greenhouse Gas Reduction Efforts

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    Recent U.S. Environmental Protection Agency actions could help the Biden administration's goals of decarbonizing the electricity sector, but they will have to potentially overcome technical, legal and political challenges, says Andrew Shaw at Dentons.

  • How Attys Can Avoid Exposing Their Firms To Cyberattacks

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    Attorneys are the weakest link in their firms' cyberdefenses because hackers often exploit the gap between individuals’ work and personal cybersecurity habits, but there are some steps lawyers can take to reduce the risks they create for their employers, say Mark Hurley and Carmine Cicalese at Digital Privacy & Protection.

  • What Purdue Ch. 11 Means For Future Of Third-Party Releases

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    The Second Circuit’s highly anticipated ruling approving Purdue Pharma’s bankruptcy plan establishes stringent factors that lower courts must consider before approving nonconsensual third-party releases, but the circuit split on the matter means the issue is far from resolved, say Gregory Hesse and Kollin Bender at Hunton.

  • Virginia 'Rocket Docket' Slowdown Is Likely A Blip

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    After being the fastest or second-fastest federal civil trial court for 14 straight years, the Eastern District of Virginia has slid to 18th place, but the rocket docket’s statistical tumble doesn't mean the district no longer maintains a speedy civil docket, says Robert Tata at Hunton.

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