Pennsylvania

  • March 11, 2024

    Widower Gets 3rd Trial Over Wife's Cancer Misdiagnosis

     A Pennsylvania Superior Court panel on Monday granted a third trial to a man whose wife died of cancer, saying that he'd presented enough evidence that her doctor's failure to follow up on discrepancies in her diagnosis deprived her of a chance for a longer life.

  • March 11, 2024

    Mexico Says High Court Long Shot Not Worth Halting Gun Suit

    The Mexican government asked a Boston federal judge to keep its lawsuit against gun manufacturers moving along while the companies float what they referred to as "sky is falling" arguments to the U.S. Supreme Court challenging a First Circuit ruling that they are not immune from claims they aid and abet drug cartel violence.

  • March 11, 2024

    Pa. Judge May Take Wheel In Uber Driver Classification Trial

    A federal jury in Philadelphia on Monday leaned toward classifying UberBlack drivers in the city as independent contractors instead of employees, but the trial judge indicated he may make the final call after a deadlock among the jurors prompted him to dismiss them.

  • March 11, 2024

    3rd Circ. Unsure Of Reasons To Halt Del. Assault Weapon Ban

    A Third Circuit panel seemed to lean toward letting Delaware keep its ban on so-called assault weapons and extended magazines during arguments Monday, with Judge Stephanos Bibas pressing gun rights advocates on their claim the ban should have been blocked solely on the grounds that a Second Amendment violation may have taken place.

  • March 11, 2024

    Court Mulls Fees, Potential Sanctions In NFL Poaching Case

    A Pennsylvania federal judge has ordered sports agency powerhouse CAA to pay legal fees to a rival shop for slow-walking discovery in a case over the alleged poaching of former NFL wide receiver Kenny Golladay, holding off on firmer penalties until trial.

  • March 11, 2024

    FTC, 10 States Sue 'Sham' Women's Cancer Fund

    The Federal Trade Commission and 10 state attorneys general have filed a federal complaint against a Pennsylvania-based cancer charity fund, calling the foundation a "sham" that deceived donors out of $18 million over five years.

  • March 11, 2024

    Philly DA Can't Escape Sanctions Over Lack Of Candor

    A Third Circuit panel has ruled that Philadelphia's district attorney, Larry Krasner, must apologize to the family of two 1984 murder victims after his office was less than forthcoming in proceedings over post-conviction relief sought by one of the killers.

  • March 11, 2024

    Kirkland, Latham Guide $35B EQT-Equitrans Gas Merger

    Kirkland & Ellis LLP-guided EQT Corp. and Latham & Watkins LLP-backed Equitrans Midstream Corp. said Monday they have agreed to merge, creating a $35 billion natural gas giant that will be "well positioned to be a globally competitive American energy leader."

  • March 08, 2024

    Split NC High Court Reopens Embattled Realty Firm

    The North Carolina Supreme Court has temporarily lifted a business shutdown order on MV Realty amid the state's claims that the company imposed predatory fees, with a dissenting justice fearing that unshackling it could put homeowners at risk of losing their homes.

  • March 08, 2024

    Uber Driver Class Claims Veering Toward Split Verdict

    A Pennsylvania federal judge told a Philadelphia jury Friday to return Monday after its eight members deadlocked on whether UberBlack drivers in the city were employees of the ride-sharing company entitled to minimum wage and benefits, or independent contractors, as Uber classified them.

  • March 08, 2024

    Construction Co., Ex-Worker Settle Travel-Time Wage Suit

    A Western Pennsylvania construction worker has settled his unpaid-wages suit against Home Pro Remodelers LLC, closing his claims that the company didn't pay him for travel time or time spent on work sites without a supervisor present.

  • March 08, 2024

    Widener U. Hit With COVID Campus Fee Refund Suit

    Pennsylvania private school Widener University has been hit with a proposed class action seeking prorated tuition and fee reimbursements over its decision to close its campus in spring 2020 in response to the COVID-19 pandemic, a move which the suit says deprived students of resources they paid for.

  • March 08, 2024

    Pa. Court Grants Seizure Of Nursing Homes In 'Dire' Condition

    A Pennsylvania federal court has granted an emergency request for a receiver to take control of six nursing homes in the state that Revere Tactical Opportunities REIT LLC claims were left in a "dire financial condition" by the properties' owners, who had also allegedly defaulted on a $30 million loan.

  • March 08, 2024

    Pa. County Agrees To Update Air Pollution Permits

    The Allegheny County Health Department will move ahead on issuing updated air pollution permits for two Pittsburgh-area chemical plants, settling a lawsuit brought by an environmental group that claimed the county's missed deadlines hamstrung citizen engagement and enforcement efforts.

  • March 07, 2024

    Skechers Fined $1.25M Over Execs' Family Member Payments

    Skechers will pay the U.S. Securities and Exchange Commission $1.25 million to resolve claims it failed to disclose hundreds of thousands of dollars in payments made to its directors and their immediate family members who were hired by the sneaker giant as contractors or nonexecutive employees.

  • March 07, 2024

    Penn State Suit Sets Off Debate Over Trademarks' Function

    The Pennsylvania State University and sports apparel retailer Vintage Brand are locked in a legal battle that could force courts to reexamine how trademarks function in merchandise licensing and potentially make it harder to prevail on counterfeiting claims, according to attorneys.

  • March 07, 2024

    Pa. Justices To Consider Liability Of Parents Hiding Son's Gun

    The Supreme Court of Pennsylvania agreed to hear an appeal asking whether the parents of a convicted murderer can be held liable for the victim's family's emotional trauma because their alleged concealment of the murder weapon delayed the discovery of their son's body.

  • March 07, 2024

    Pa. Counselor Says She Got No Help At Non-Accessible School

    A former school counselor with a prosthetic leg says her nonprofit employer refused to help when her assigned school wouldn't accommodate her disability, then fired her for complaining, according to a lawsuit filed in Pennsylvania state court.

  • March 07, 2024

    Pa. Panel Chides Court For Sealing Murder Case Docket

    The Pennsylvania Superior Court has ruled in a precedential opinion that a county judge violated the First Amendment in sealing the docket in a criminal case and denying access to local media trying to report on the alleged murder-for-hire of a man in Westmoreland County.

  • March 07, 2024

    Estate, Collector Settle Spat Over 'Blade Runner' Poster Art

    The family of a former movie poster artist and a Pennsylvania attorney-turned-art collector have settled a dispute over the original art for a "Blade Runner" poster, with the parties agreeing to sell the art and split the proceeds.

  • March 07, 2024

    Nissan Cooling Fans Defective, Class Suit Claims

    A proposed class of car buyers is suing Nissan North America Inc. in Tennessee federal court, alleging the automaker made and sold Pathfinder and Infiniti vehicles with defective radiator fans, leading to engines overheating and shutting down.

  • March 06, 2024

    Meta Must Tackle Increased Account Hijackings, 41 AGs Say

    A bipartisan group of 41 attorneys general have urged Meta Platforms Inc. to tackle the "dramatic" increase in hackers taking over Facebook and Instagram accounts, saying the attacks have caused financial harm to victims and their families and friends.

  • March 06, 2024

    Pa. Pharma Co. Cops To Adulterated-Drug Charges

    A Pennsylvania generic drug manufacturer has pled guilty to federal charges that it sold adulterated drugs in the U.S. into interstate commerce and agreed to pay a $1.5 million penalty, the U.S. Department of Justice said Wednesday.

  • March 06, 2024

    Choice Can Confirm Award Over $61M In Franchisee Claims

    Choice Hotels has been ordered to pay a roughly $780,000 arbitration award after dozens of South Asian franchisees earlier fought the hotel chain's bid to arbitrate their claims that a vendor kickback scheme cost them $61 million.

  • March 06, 2024

    Norfolk Southern Can't Shift Cleanup Costs To Tank Car Cos.

    Norfolk Southern cannot dump environmental cleanup costs on seven tank car owners and shipping customers with rail cars transporting chemicals and hazardous materials on the train that derailed in East Palestine last year, an Ohio federal judge said Wednesday.

Expert Analysis

  • 5th Circ. Ruling Reminds Attys That CBP Can Search Devices

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    The Fifth Circuit’s recent Malik v. Department of Homeland Security decision adds to the chorus of federal courts holding that border agents don’t need a warrant to search travelers’ electronic devices, so attorneys should consider certain special precautions to secure privileged information when reentering the U.S., says Jennifer Freel at Jackson Walker.

  • Avoiding The Ethical Pitfalls Of Crowdfunded Legal Fees

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    The crowdfunding of legal fees has become increasingly common, providing a new way for people to afford legal services, but attorneys who accept crowdsourced funds must remember several key ethical obligations to mitigate their risks, say Hilary Gerzhoy and Julienne Pasichow at HWG.

  • Appellate Rulings Highlight Telecom Standard Uncertainties

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    Two recent contrasting appellate opinions in Cellco v. White Deer Township and NMSurf v. Webber — interpreting Sections 332 and 253 of the Communications Act, respectively — demonstrate the continuing uncertainty carriers face when challenging state and local requirements that may impede their provision of telecommunications services, say attorneys at Davis Wright.

  • And Now A Word From The Panel: A One-State MDL?

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    As the Judicial Panel on Multidistrict Litigation prepares for its September hearing session where it will consider a petition in which the two constituent actions are both pending in Pennsylvania, but in different districts, Alan Rothman at Sidley points out that the presence of actions in a single state does not preclude the filing of an MDL petition.

  • 2 Cases May Expand CFPB's Reach On Deceptive Practices

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    In two separate cases, the Consumer Financial Protection Bureau is asserting a broad interpretation of who is subject to the Consumer Financial Protection Act's prohibition on unfair, deceptive, or abusive acts and practices, raising questions about what an expansion of its authority might mean for consumer credit markets, say John Coleman and Leslie Meredith at Orrick.

  • Exclusivity Loss Holds Power In Trade Secret Damages Claims

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    A Pennsylvania federal court's recent decision in Elite Transit v. Cunningham adds to a growing body of case law that illustrates how the loss of trade secret exclusivity alone may be sufficient for claiming damages, even when commercialization of a trade secret has not occurred, say Christopher DeBaere and Julia Bloch at Archway Research.

  • Section 363 Ruling Lines Up With Avoidance Action Precedent

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    While it is safe to say that avoidance actions in bankruptcy cases are the exception, not the rule, when selling assets in a Section 363 sale, the Eighth Circuit’s recent ruling in Simply Essentials’ Chapter 5 case reveals uniformity among courts that have considered the issue, says Daniel Lowenthal at Patterson Belknap.

  • What Large Language Models Mean For Document Review

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    Courts often subject parties using technology assisted review to greater scrutiny than parties conducting linear, manual document review, so parties using large language models for document review should expect even more attention, along with a corresponding need for quality control and validation, say attorneys at Sidley.

  • Checking In On How SuperValu Has Altered FCA Litigation

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    Four months after the U.S. Supreme Court's ruling in U.S. ex rel. Chutte v. SuperValu, the decision's reach may be more limited than initially anticipated, with the expansion of the scienter standard counterbalanced by some potential defense tools for defendants, say Elena Quattrone and Olivia Plinio at Epstein Becker.

  • Series

    Participating In Living History Makes Me A Better Lawyer

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    My role as a baron in a living history group, and my work as volunteer corporate counsel for a book series fan association, has provided me several opportunities to practice in unexpected areas of law — opening doors to experiences that have nurtured invaluable personal and professional skills, says Matthew Parker at the Nebraska Department of Health and Human Services.

  • Opinion

    Private Equity Owners Can Remedy Law Firms' Agency Issues

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    Nonlawyer, private-equity ownership of law firms can benefit shareholders and others vulnerable to governance issues such as disparate interests, and can in turn help resolve agency problems, says Michael Di Gennaro at The Law Practice Exchange.

  • How To Protect Atty-Client Privilege While Using Generative AI

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    When using generative artificial intelligence tools, attorneys should consider several safeguards to avoid breaches or complications in attorney-client privilege, say Antonious Sadek and Christopher Campbell at DLA Piper.

  • What FERC-PJM Negotiations Mean For The Energy Industry

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    Following the aftermath of Winter Storm Elliot, disputes associated with the PJM Interconnection settlement negotiations taking place at the Federal Energy Regulatory Commission have brought to the fore a potential legal minefield arising out of extreme weather events that could lead to commercial risks for power generating companies, say attorneys at Hogan Lovells.

  • How New Lawyers Can Leverage Feedback For Growth

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    Embracing constructive criticism as a tool for success can help new lawyers accelerate their professional growth and law firms build a culture of continuous improvement, says Katie Aldrich at Fringe Professional Development.

  • Bracing For Rising Cyber-Related False Claims Act Scrutiny

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    Two recent cyber-related False Claims Act cases illustrate the vulnerability of government contractors, including universities, obliged to self-attest compliance with multiple controls, signal the importance of accurate internal controls and underline the benefits of self-disclosure, say Townsend Bourne and Nikole Snyder at Sheppard Mullin.

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